Jennifer Waterbury Beaumont

 
Natarajasana             photo by Jim Gebben 

Natarajasana             photo by Jim Gebben 

 

has been studying and practicing yoga in the Iyengar lineage for two decades. Jennifer began an intense study of Iyengar yoga while an honors college freshman at the University of Michigan. After graduation with high honors, as a poet in the Creative Writing program of L S & A, Jennifer met her teacher, Manouso Manos during his annual workshop in town. Shortly after she moved to San Francisco to apprentice with him at the Abode of Iyengar Yoga. She began teaching Iyengar Yoga in 2003 in San Francisco. She continues her studentship with her first teachers, (direct students of Yogacharya Sri B.K.S. Iyengar) Manouso Manos, and Laurie Blakeney, and has studied with B.K.S. Iyengar, and his daughter, Geeta Iyengar, and son, Prashant Iyengar, in Pune, India for two months, and also in the United States, as well as other Senior & Advanced Iyengar Yoga Teachers.

Now a Certified Iyengar Yoga Teacher at the Intermediate Jr. 2 level, Jennifer was the first CIYT in West Michigan. She currently serves as a mentoring teacher in the Iyengar system of teacher certification (IYNAUS). The mother of two children, she practiced and taught Iyengar yoga through healthy pregnancies & home births, becoming an authoritative yoga teacher for women undergoing the transformative experiences of motherhood. Jennifer views Iyengar yoga as a creative art form that leads to the potential for deep and lasting transformation. Intense practice has improved her health and continues to reveal new light. She inspires students to overcome physical & mental limitations through the tools gained in consistent study in classes and realized through the power of practice. 

 
We are all sculptors and painters, and our material is our own flesh and bones.
— Henry David Thoreau
Just as in a dream, the dreamer appears in many different ways but is one on awakening, so the universe appears to have many forms.
— Shiva Samhita - I. 38
Don’t follow in the footsteps of the old poets, seek what they sought.
— Matsuo Bashō